IVM reprocessed for 2020 - 2021

Includes every day with a conjugate maneuver

Dr. Thomas Immel 0 307

A number of IVM data are reprocessed on days between Feb 7, 2020 and Dec 22, 2021 where conjugate observation periods are present. The long list of these data is noted below. This correctly flags the IVM data mid-manuever to be good. It is recommended that if one is interested in data obtained during these short periods of time that you work with the latest revision of the data where the data quality flag is correct. Watch for timestamps reflecting the reprocessing date in February 2022 and an increase in the revision number over previously available data. Zip files containing these data will be published by Feb 14.

Mission Operations Update #7 - New Plasma Velocity products

IVM data now at version 5

Dr. Thomas Immel 0 319

New IVM Level 2 data (Version 5 of Product 2.7) are now available. This update improves the running correction for observed bias, using a measurement window that extends days into the future to inform the correction. As such, the data are released several weeks behind other products (2.2 and 2.4 for example) We recommend that users migrate to these products (available on the ICON FTP site) and review the documentation available here.

 

Mission Operations Update #4 - New IVM L1 and L2 data now available

Dr. Thomas Immel 0 842

New IVM Level 2 data (Version 4 of Product 2.7) is now available. This update extends the dataset to the end of 2020 and provide a correction for observed bias in all three velocity components. We recommend that users migrate to these products as soon as they are available. The largest correction is to ram velocities.

The version 3 Level 1IVM data are already approved and available on the FTP site.

First ICON Science Data Released to Public

Karin Hauck 0 1166

[by Lina Tran on the NASA blog] On June 22, NASA’s ICON team released scientific data collected during the spacecraft’s first eight months in orbit to the public.

The data release features observations from ICON’s four instruments — MIGHTI, FUV, EUV, and IVM — which have been observing the ins and outs of the ionosphere, the sea of charged particles high in the upper atmosphere. Scientists have been busy parsing the wealth of observations collected by ICON in preparation for the mission’s first science results, which will be released later this year.

“ICON was designed, built, and launched to provide data we had never seen before, and it has not disappointed us in any regard,” said Thomas Immel, ICON principal investigator at University of California, Berkeley. Immel said he was pleased to share ICON’s first data with the world. “The sensitivity and precision of our observations, and the unique orbit and mission design, give us a new and advanced tool for unlocking all the puzzling questions we have had about the connection between Earth’s atmosphere and our space environment.”

The release coincides with the virtual summer meeting of CEDAR, the Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions program. The newly released data spans measurements made since the mission’s launch on Oct. 10, 2019. Data can be accessed through University of California Berkeley’s Space Sciences Lab.

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ICON skin is based on Greytness by Adammer
Background image, courtesy of NASA, is a derivitave of photograph taken by D. Pettit from the ISS, used under Creative Commons license