Exploring Where Earth's Weather Meets Space Weather

The Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) will be the newest addition to NASA’s fleet of Heliophysics satellites. Led by UC Berkeley, scientists and engineers around the world are coming together to make ICON a reality.

The goal of the ICON mission is to understand the tug-of-war between Earth’s atmosphere and the space environment. In the "no mans land" of the ionosphere, a continuous struggle between solar forcing and Earth’s weather systems drive extreme and unpredicted variability. ICON will investigate the forces at play in the near-space environment, leading the way in understanding disturbances that can lead to severe interference with communications and GPS signals.
 
Where's ICON now?
  "Where is ICON" visualization tool.


Watch Next!

On June 4th LIVE: NASA EDGE show about ICON's ferry flight to Kwajalein (from Vandenberg AFB)

     

    Latest News

    Social media group spends a day at SSL for ICON "NASA Social"

    Karin Hauck 0 208

    The Space Sciences Lab had the great pleasure of hosting this fantastic group of social media bloggers all day on June 13 for a "NASA Social" featuring ICON. A NASA Social event is an informal meeting of people who engage with NASA social media accounts. After applying for media credentials and being vetted by NASA, they have the opportunity to go behind-the-scenes at NASA facilities and events and speak with scientists, engineers, technicians and managers, and they tweet and post to their respective social media along the way. Our closest NASA Social visitor came from San Jose UC Berkeley and the farthest from Colombia, South America; a YouTuber came from Montreal. Their day at SSL began with talks and close interaction with the ICON team and the ICON life-size payload model. The afternoon included a special tour of mission operations and an opportunity to get close to the 11-meter satellite dish during a data pass.

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    ICON skin is based on Greytness by Adammer
    Background image, courtesy of NASA, is a derivitave of photograph taken by D. Pettit from the ISS, used under Creative Commons license